Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

How to revitalise
Australia’s economy

Andrew Stone’s important new book lays out an economic agenda that is coherent and comprehensive, yet politically achievable over the next three to five years by a federal government with the resolve to implement it.

Order your copy here.

Addressing immigration, the housing market, higher education reform, federal‑state relations, energy policy, workforce participation, welfare reform, budget repair, monetary policy and financial system regulation, the book demonstrates that good government worthy of the respect and support of the Australian people is not merely possible but vital.

What others are saying of Restoring Hope:

Niall Ferguson: “This is an ambitious program of structural as well as fiscal reform. Let us hope there are politicians willing to take the risks inherent in such a radical strategy.” 

Peter Costello:  “Andrew Stone reminds us that improving productivity is the key to future living standards in Australia. He identifies a range of areas where this could be examined. The hard work of economic reform cannot be done without explaining the options and building public support.”

John Howard:  “Andrew Stone has undertaken the difficult task of arguing in detail for a range of economic reforms. That he has done it at a time when, in the eyes of some, reform is in the doldrums is all the more praiseworthy. His analysis of the housing issue is impressive.”

Insights from Quadrant

A chalk-dusted heretic

At left on our homepage, Frank Salter details the low standard of Australian teaching, infused as it is with politically correct mythology and the Left’s obsession with viewing every topic through the distorting lens of identity politics. British teacher Katharine Birbalsingh encountered the same poisons at work in London schools, spoke of them in public calls for reform — and very quickly found herself suspended as a consequence.

As she observes, while the Left establishment talks a good game about diversity and acceptance, it exiles and assails any and all who beg to differ.

In the video above Ms Birbalsingh details her personal evolution from unthinking instrument of the Left to an activist headmistress of a charter school, plus much more.

Insights from Quadrant

Breaking China

Conrad Black on China, its quislings and useful idiots, and what is to be done in response to Beijing’s bellicosity:

… Being as positive as reasonably possible, it seems that the Chinese were experimenting with a range of dangerous viruses, and that this one escaped unintentionally, and the highest levels of the Chinese government determined to deny what was happening, thereby assuring the infection of much of the world. If this was deliberate Chinese government policy from the start, it was an act of war; though it could not be responded to with outright hostilities.

It seems a reasonable surmise that the Chinese had succumbed to the frequent habit of those with aggressive ambitions of believing what they wished to believe. Moreover, they appear to have assumed the United States and the West generally would continue to tolerate immense trade deficits, the endless theft of intellectual property, systematic Chinese violations of international law in international waters, the creeping takeover of underdeveloped countries through a corrupt program of loans, and generally the “Belt and Road” program of expanding Chinese hegemony throughout East and South Asia and Africa…

Black’s essay can be read in full here.

Insights from Quadrant

A ‘strine note
in Beijing’s choir

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted many things, but not the global distribution of evasive talking points. Here, for example, is China’s ambassador to Canada, Cong Peiwu, responding to a question about the Middle Kingdom’s willingness or otherwise to take part in the investigation of the Wuhan Flu’s origins, the probe PM Scott Morrison and other world leaders have demanded.

“I think for this type of review should be inclusive in nature. It should address the total [global] response to the COVID-19 and fast!”

It might just be a coincidence but Victoria’s premier, Daniel Andrews, could almost have been reading from the same script when quizzed this morning (May 18) by the ABC’s Virginia Trioli. As with China’s man in Ottawa, Andrews ducked any mention of the question’s key word, “origin”, calling instead for a global survey of how individual nations have responded to the pandemic.

“There should be a thorough review across the whole world about the way in which each of us have dealt with this pandemic …

In case Trioli hadn’t quite grasped that determining how the virus came to be is of not the slightest interest to Victoria’s leader, the Premier then stressed how vital are Victoria’s ties to China before repeating himself on the need to have a long, hard look, not at where the virus came from, but what has been done to counter it:

“Let’s a have a review across the whole world. “

When Victoria became the only Australian state to sign up for Beijing’s Belt and Road initiative, Premier Andrews at first refused to reveal the terms of the agreement he had made on behalf of the citizens who elected him. After much prodding the document was released and can be read in full here, courtesy of the ABC.  Do make a note of Article III (V):

Both parties will review periodically the progress of cooperation under the Memorandum of Understanding through diverse forms of communication as necessity arises ar various working levels, such as exchanges of visits, video conferences, correspondence, etc

“Diverse forms of communication”, eh?

One guesses that includes emailed talking points.

— roger franklin

Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

How to revitalise
Australia’s economy

Andrew Stone’s important new book lays out an economic agenda that is coherent and comprehensive, yet politically achievable over the next three to five years by a federal government with the resolve to implement it.

Order your copy here.

Addressing immigration, the housing market, higher education reform, federal‑state relations, energy policy, workforce participation, welfare reform, budget repair, monetary policy and financial system regulation, the book demonstrates that good government worthy of the respect and support of the Australian people is not merely possible but vital.

What others are saying of Restoring Hope:

Niall Ferguson: “This is an ambitious program of structural as well as fiscal reform. Let us hope there are politicians willing to take the risks inherent in such a radical strategy.” 

Peter Costello:  “Andrew Stone reminds us that improving productivity is the key to future living standards in Australia. He identifies a range of areas where this could be examined. The hard work of economic reform cannot be done without explaining the options and building public support.”

John Howard:  “Andrew Stone has undertaken the difficult task of arguing in detail for a range of economic reforms. That he has done it at a time when, in the eyes of some, reform is in the doldrums is all the more praiseworthy. His analysis of the housing issue is impressive.”

Insights from Quadrant

A chalk-dusted heretic

At left on our homepage, Frank Salter details the low standard of Australian teaching, infused as it is with politically correct mythology and the Left’s obsession with viewing every topic through the distorting lens of identity politics. British teacher Katharine Birbalsingh encountered the same poisons at work in London schools, spoke of them in public calls for reform — and very quickly found herself suspended as a consequence.

As she observes, while the Left establishment talks a good game about diversity and acceptance, it exiles and assails any and all who beg to differ.

In the video above Ms Birbalsingh details her personal evolution from unthinking instrument of the Left to an activist headmistress of a charter school, plus much more.

Insights from Quadrant

Breaking China

Conrad Black on China, its quislings and useful idiots, and what is to be done in response to Beijing’s bellicosity:

… Being as positive as reasonably possible, it seems that the Chinese were experimenting with a range of dangerous viruses, and that this one escaped unintentionally, and the highest levels of the Chinese government determined to deny what was happening, thereby assuring the infection of much of the world. If this was deliberate Chinese government policy from the start, it was an act of war; though it could not be responded to with outright hostilities.

It seems a reasonable surmise that the Chinese had succumbed to the frequent habit of those with aggressive ambitions of believing what they wished to believe. Moreover, they appear to have assumed the United States and the West generally would continue to tolerate immense trade deficits, the endless theft of intellectual property, systematic Chinese violations of international law in international waters, the creeping takeover of underdeveloped countries through a corrupt program of loans, and generally the “Belt and Road” program of expanding Chinese hegemony throughout East and South Asia and Africa…

Black’s essay can be read in full here.

Insights from Quadrant

A ‘strine note
in Beijing’s choir

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted many things, but not the global distribution of evasive talking points. Here, for example, is China’s ambassador to Canada, Cong Peiwu, responding to a question about the Middle Kingdom’s willingness or otherwise to take part in the investigation of the Wuhan Flu’s origins, the probe PM Scott Morrison and other world leaders have demanded.

“I think for this type of review should be inclusive in nature. It should address the total [global] response to the COVID-19 and fast!”

It might just be a coincidence but Victoria’s premier, Daniel Andrews, could almost have been reading from the same script when quizzed this morning (May 18) by the ABC’s Virginia Trioli. As with China’s man in Ottawa, Andrews ducked any mention of the question’s key word, “origin”, calling instead for a global survey of how individual nations have responded to the pandemic.

“There should be a thorough review across the whole world about the way in which each of us have dealt with this pandemic …

In case Trioli hadn’t quite grasped that determining how the virus came to be is of not the slightest interest to Victoria’s leader, the Premier then stressed how vital are Victoria’s ties to China before repeating himself on the need to have a long, hard look, not at where the virus came from, but what has been done to counter it:

“Let’s a have a review across the whole world. “

When Victoria became the only Australian state to sign up for Beijing’s Belt and Road initiative, Premier Andrews at first refused to reveal the terms of the agreement he had made on behalf of the citizens who elected him. After much prodding the document was released and can be read in full here, courtesy of the ABC.  Do make a note of Article III (V):

Both parties will review periodically the progress of cooperation under the Memorandum of Understanding through diverse forms of communication as necessity arises ar various working levels, such as exchanges of visits, video conferences, correspondence, etc

“Diverse forms of communication”, eh?

One guesses that includes emailed talking points.

— roger franklin