Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

Here are some recent Quadrant book releases with direct links to our online store.

Beating France to Botany Bay
by Margaret Cameron-Ash

The reason French isn’t Australia’s native tongue? Well, it was a close run thing, as Margaret Cameron-Ash details in her page-turning account of the race between superpowers that would determine if the Union Jack or Tricoleur claimed the Great South Land. Order here

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The Persecution of George Pell
by Keith Windschuttle

Had it not been for the High Court, an innocent man might still be in prison for a ‘crime’ that simply could not have been committed as VicPol’s stitch-up of an investigation insisted. Windschuttle lays bare the travesty of Pell’s persecution in a forensic examination of what may well be the most appalling legal and media lynching in living memory. Order here

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Bitter Harvest
by Peter O’Brien

Fauxborigine Bruce Pascoe was pocketing awards and prizes all over when O’Brien picked up his Dark Emu ‘truer history’ and realised within a few pages that it was not merely a work of slipshod scholarship but, far worse than that, a brazen confection written in the ink of bare-faced gall. Order here

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The White Australia Policy
by Keith Windschuttle

Academic historians argue Australia’s immigration policy was so shamefully racist it bears comparison with South Africa under apartheid, even suggesting it represented an overture to the ‘master race’ nationalism of Nazi Germany. None of this resembles the truth, not even remotely. Order here

And for a final treat, why not become a Quadrant subscriber?

 

Insights from Quadrant

Journalism, truth’s antidote

Until recently, Zac Kriegman was a very well paid data analyst with Reuters. But then he crunched the numbers of US police shootings involving black Americans and quickly discerned the Black Lives Matter narrative, the one being promoted by his news-wire employer, had not the slightest basis in fact.

The result of urging a journalistic enterprise to tell the truth? Mr Kreigman is no longer a Reuters employee. He writes at Substack:

In one story, Reuters reported on police in Kenosha, Wisconsin shooting a black man, Jacob Blake, in the back—but failed to mention that they did so only after he grabbed a knife and looked likely to lunge at them.

In another story, Reuters referred “to a wave of killings of African-Americans by police using unjustified lethal force,” despite a lack of statistical evidence that such a wave of police killings had taken place. (In 2020, 18 unarmed black Americans were killed by police, according to The Washington Post database.)

And in yet another, Reuters referred to the shooting of Michael Brown as one of a number of “egregious examples of lethal police violence,” despite the fact that an investigation conducted by the Justice Department—then run by Barack Obama’s Attorney General Eric Holder—had cleared the police officer in question of all wrongdoing.  

A pattern was starting to emerge: Reporters and editors would omit key details that undermined the BLM narrative. More important than reporting accurately was upholding—nurturing—that storyline.

Having been relentlessly attacked, including being likened to a Klansman by fellow Reuters employees on the company’s intraweb internal messaging system, he was fired.

Kriegman’s is an American story, but also by extension an Australian one, as Reuters and AAP dispatches form the backbone of what we are told of life as it is allegedly lived on the other side of the Pacific. Bear that in mind when you next tune in to the ABC or pick up a Nine newspaper.

–rf

Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

Here are some recent Quadrant book releases with direct links to our online store.

Beating France to Botany Bay
by Margaret Cameron-Ash

The reason French isn’t Australia’s native tongue? Well, it was a close run thing, as Margaret Cameron-Ash details in her page-turning account of the race between superpowers that would determine if the Union Jack or Tricoleur claimed the Great South Land. Order here

_________________

The Persecution of George Pell
by Keith Windschuttle

Had it not been for the High Court, an innocent man might still be in prison for a ‘crime’ that simply could not have been committed as VicPol’s stitch-up of an investigation insisted. Windschuttle lays bare the travesty of Pell’s persecution in a forensic examination of what may well be the most appalling legal and media lynching in living memory. Order here

_________________

Bitter Harvest
by Peter O’Brien

Fauxborigine Bruce Pascoe was pocketing awards and prizes all over when O’Brien picked up his Dark Emu ‘truer history’ and realised within a few pages that it was not merely a work of slipshod scholarship but, far worse than that, a brazen confection written in the ink of bare-faced gall. Order here

_________________

The White Australia Policy
by Keith Windschuttle

Academic historians argue Australia’s immigration policy was so shamefully racist it bears comparison with South Africa under apartheid, even suggesting it represented an overture to the ‘master race’ nationalism of Nazi Germany. None of this resembles the truth, not even remotely. Order here

And for a final treat, why not become a Quadrant subscriber?

 

Insights from Quadrant

Journalism, truth’s antidote

Until recently, Zac Kriegman was a very well paid data analyst with Reuters. But then he crunched the numbers of US police shootings involving black Americans and quickly discerned the Black Lives Matter narrative, the one being promoted by his news-wire employer, had not the slightest basis in fact.

The result of urging a journalistic enterprise to tell the truth? Mr Kreigman is no longer a Reuters employee. He writes at Substack:

In one story, Reuters reported on police in Kenosha, Wisconsin shooting a black man, Jacob Blake, in the back—but failed to mention that they did so only after he grabbed a knife and looked likely to lunge at them.

In another story, Reuters referred “to a wave of killings of African-Americans by police using unjustified lethal force,” despite a lack of statistical evidence that such a wave of police killings had taken place. (In 2020, 18 unarmed black Americans were killed by police, according to The Washington Post database.)

And in yet another, Reuters referred to the shooting of Michael Brown as one of a number of “egregious examples of lethal police violence,” despite the fact that an investigation conducted by the Justice Department—then run by Barack Obama’s Attorney General Eric Holder—had cleared the police officer in question of all wrongdoing.  

A pattern was starting to emerge: Reporters and editors would omit key details that undermined the BLM narrative. More important than reporting accurately was upholding—nurturing—that storyline.

Having been relentlessly attacked, including being likened to a Klansman by fellow Reuters employees on the company’s intraweb internal messaging system, he was fired.

Kriegman’s is an American story, but also by extension an Australian one, as Reuters and AAP dispatches form the backbone of what we are told of life as it is allegedly lived on the other side of the Pacific. Bear that in mind when you next tune in to the ABC or pick up a Nine newspaper.

–rf