Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

Bitter Harvest
now on sale

Peter O’Brien’s highly readable vivisection of Dark Emu, author Bruce Pascoe’s best-selling and deeply flawed portrait of Aborigines as sedentary agriculturalists with ‘skills superior to those of the white colonisers who took their land and despoiled it’ has now been released by Quadrant Books.

Order your copy here.

Insights from Quadrant

Notes from all over

The ever-modest James Delingpole, who has a nice word for Quadrant and climate scam roundsman Tony Thomas, on the tenth anniversary of Climategate:

… What Climategate revealed, however, is that the climate change “experts” we’re supposed to trust just aren’t trustworthy. They lie, they cheat, they’re motivated more by grant-troughing and dodgy political activism than they are by — lol — the disinterested quest for knowledge. That was the real shocker at the time of Climategate: that the people on whose “expert” wisdom trillions of dollars worth of your money and my money are being spent on sundry green boondoggles are in fact a lousy bunch of fraudulent second-raters unfit to run a cookie bake sale, let alone a scam involving upwards of one percent of the global economy…

Meanwhile, Israel Folau attributes bushfires and brimstone to the wrong god and is further assailed by those who know for a “settled science” certainty that it is not Yahweh but Gaia inflicting the flames on carbon sots and other sinners staining their green souls with the sins of SUV ownership and an appreciation of air conditioning. If only the ousted rugby star had traded his favoured variety of religious ratbaggery for the Church of Climate Change, oh how his sporting career might have been allowed to prosper.

Folau’s sin was speaking his mind in an age when unauthorised utterances simply aren’t tolerated. In this regard,  ABC Washington correspondent James Glenday could give him a few pointers on the astute omission of pertinent but inconvenient information. That talent is much appreciated at the national broadcaster, where Sarah Ferguson’s train-wreck three-part 4Corners series on Donald Trump’s fealty to Moscow made the point rather neatly. Having  managed to avoid any reference or explanation that might have diminished her portrait of the US President as Putin’s puppet, she further demonstrated her ABC-worthiness by neglecting to file a post-Mueller follow-up report conceding all her earlier hints, suggestions and accusations amounted to nothing better than a melange of misinformation. Now she’s off to China with hubby Tony Jones in tow to report the goings on in Beijing, failing upwards also being an oft-seen ABC motif.

On that precedent, reporter Glenday can also anticipate a glittering ABC career, as his weekend report on how badly the impeachment is going for Trump turns to law professor Susan Low Bloch for confirmation. She “believes Donald Trump committed a textbook, impeachable offence.”

An impartial observer? Not quite.

One of the great American innovations is a website, OpenSecrets.org, where individuals’ donations to politicians and parties can be looked up in a few seconds and a couple of clicks. The entries for Professor Bloch’s donations would seem to indicate a devoted and long-term Democrat with deep pockets. That information would have been useful for any of Glenday’s readers, who might not have been left with the impression that the professor’s analysis of the impeachment was that of an impartial academic, rather than that of a highly partisan four-figure-sum supporter of Hillary Clinton.

As the US blogger David Burge puts it, modern journalism is about covering stories — covering them with a pillow until the inconvenient ones show no more sign of life whatsoever. There is a haberdashery store’s supply of pillows at the ABC.

— roger franklin

Insights from Quadrant

Different when
it’s a Democrat

Mark Steyn on Washington’s ongoing impeachment burlesque:

In a functioning system, the head of the government sets foreign policy and the diplomats enact it. So naturally there’s not a chance of that in Washington. When Taylor and Kent whine that there seemed to be a “shadow foreign policy”, the shadow is theirs; they spent a day testifying that everything had been going ticketty-boo for decades just as they’d always done things – and then Trump came along and took a different view. Oh, my! Anyone would think that, as Barack Obama once proposed, “elections have consequences”.

Anyone who stayed up late last night to watch the circus on Capitol Hill will have heard committee chairman Adam Schiff make much of then-ambassador to the Ukraine Marie Yovanovich’s (above) recall to Washington. It was, he intimated, an outrageous and unprecedented assault on a fine public servant and further proof of the need to see Donald Trump ejected from the White House. Ambassadors should be immune to the imperatives of presidents, he asserted.

Except if a Democrat happens to occupy 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Then it’s fair and reasonable to fire not one ambassador but all and any appointed by a predecessor, for that is exactly what Barack Obama did in 2009.

Insights from Quadrant

Heat and serve
in a crock

In his marking of Climategate’s tenth anniversary, Tony Thomas notes how in 2015 “Prime Minister Tony Abbott set in train an audit of Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology’s temperature adjustments that increased Australia’s apparent warming, but one of the first moves of his successor, Malcolm Turnbull, was to scuttle that audit.” Add another noxious legacy to the ousted PM’s cack-handed tenure (nuclear submarines converted to diesel, anyone?),  as the BoM has continued to tickle the stats.

And wouldn’t you just know it, those adjustments to the temperature record always make things hotter. Jo Nova writes:

Wow, just wow. Look what the Bureau of Meteorology has covertly done to February. Something like one third of a degree has been added to the average Australian summer maximum anomalies over the past few years according to the “expert” data from the worlds-best-practise equipment.

In the BOM Whopper Part 1 we revealed that in the BOM’s latest round of unannounced adjustments there were big increases in the rate of Australian summer warming. It turns out a lot of the summer rise comes from changes to February. Mysteriously, there were large changes to the national average of the last three years. Let that sink in.

These changes were incomprehensible because while the averaged “whole nation” got warmer, there were no changes to the data in any of the 104 individual stations.

It’s all rather spooky… but what it isn’t, is scientific….

Ms Nova’s posts can be read in full here for Part One  and here for Part Two. As she observes, “The cheapest way to prevent man-made global warming is stop the BOM altering the data.”

Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

Bitter Harvest
now on sale

Peter O’Brien’s highly readable vivisection of Dark Emu, author Bruce Pascoe’s best-selling and deeply flawed portrait of Aborigines as sedentary agriculturalists with ‘skills superior to those of the white colonisers who took their land and despoiled it’ has now been released by Quadrant Books.

Order your copy here.

Insights from Quadrant

Notes from all over

The ever-modest James Delingpole, who has a nice word for Quadrant and climate scam roundsman Tony Thomas, on the tenth anniversary of Climategate:

… What Climategate revealed, however, is that the climate change “experts” we’re supposed to trust just aren’t trustworthy. They lie, they cheat, they’re motivated more by grant-troughing and dodgy political activism than they are by — lol — the disinterested quest for knowledge. That was the real shocker at the time of Climategate: that the people on whose “expert” wisdom trillions of dollars worth of your money and my money are being spent on sundry green boondoggles are in fact a lousy bunch of fraudulent second-raters unfit to run a cookie bake sale, let alone a scam involving upwards of one percent of the global economy…

Meanwhile, Israel Folau attributes bushfires and brimstone to the wrong god and is further assailed by those who know for a “settled science” certainty that it is not Yahweh but Gaia inflicting the flames on carbon sots and other sinners staining their green souls with the sins of SUV ownership and an appreciation of air conditioning. If only the ousted rugby star had traded his favoured variety of religious ratbaggery for the Church of Climate Change, oh how his sporting career might have been allowed to prosper.

Folau’s sin was speaking his mind in an age when unauthorised utterances simply aren’t tolerated. In this regard,  ABC Washington correspondent James Glenday could give him a few pointers on the astute omission of pertinent but inconvenient information. That talent is much appreciated at the national broadcaster, where Sarah Ferguson’s train-wreck three-part 4Corners series on Donald Trump’s fealty to Moscow made the point rather neatly. Having  managed to avoid any reference or explanation that might have diminished her portrait of the US President as Putin’s puppet, she further demonstrated her ABC-worthiness by neglecting to file a post-Mueller follow-up report conceding all her earlier hints, suggestions and accusations amounted to nothing better than a melange of misinformation. Now she’s off to China with hubby Tony Jones in tow to report the goings on in Beijing, failing upwards also being an oft-seen ABC motif.

On that precedent, reporter Glenday can also anticipate a glittering ABC career, as his weekend report on how badly the impeachment is going for Trump turns to law professor Susan Low Bloch for confirmation. She “believes Donald Trump committed a textbook, impeachable offence.”

An impartial observer? Not quite.

One of the great American innovations is a website, OpenSecrets.org, where individuals’ donations to politicians and parties can be looked up in a few seconds and a couple of clicks. The entries for Professor Bloch’s donations would seem to indicate a devoted and long-term Democrat with deep pockets. That information would have been useful for any of Glenday’s readers, who might not have been left with the impression that the professor’s analysis of the impeachment was that of an impartial academic, rather than that of a highly partisan four-figure-sum supporter of Hillary Clinton.

As the US blogger David Burge puts it, modern journalism is about covering stories — covering them with a pillow until the inconvenient ones show no more sign of life whatsoever. There is a haberdashery store’s supply of pillows at the ABC.

— roger franklin

Insights from Quadrant

Different when
it’s a Democrat

Mark Steyn on Washington’s ongoing impeachment burlesque:

In a functioning system, the head of the government sets foreign policy and the diplomats enact it. So naturally there’s not a chance of that in Washington. When Taylor and Kent whine that there seemed to be a “shadow foreign policy”, the shadow is theirs; they spent a day testifying that everything had been going ticketty-boo for decades just as they’d always done things – and then Trump came along and took a different view. Oh, my! Anyone would think that, as Barack Obama once proposed, “elections have consequences”.

Anyone who stayed up late last night to watch the circus on Capitol Hill will have heard committee chairman Adam Schiff make much of then-ambassador to the Ukraine Marie Yovanovich’s (above) recall to Washington. It was, he intimated, an outrageous and unprecedented assault on a fine public servant and further proof of the need to see Donald Trump ejected from the White House. Ambassadors should be immune to the imperatives of presidents, he asserted.

Except if a Democrat happens to occupy 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Then it’s fair and reasonable to fire not one ambassador but all and any appointed by a predecessor, for that is exactly what Barack Obama did in 2009.

Insights from Quadrant

Heat and serve
in a crock

In his marking of Climategate’s tenth anniversary, Tony Thomas notes how in 2015 “Prime Minister Tony Abbott set in train an audit of Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology’s temperature adjustments that increased Australia’s apparent warming, but one of the first moves of his successor, Malcolm Turnbull, was to scuttle that audit.” Add another noxious legacy to the ousted PM’s cack-handed tenure (nuclear submarines converted to diesel, anyone?),  as the BoM has continued to tickle the stats.

And wouldn’t you just know it, those adjustments to the temperature record always make things hotter. Jo Nova writes:

Wow, just wow. Look what the Bureau of Meteorology has covertly done to February. Something like one third of a degree has been added to the average Australian summer maximum anomalies over the past few years according to the “expert” data from the worlds-best-practise equipment.

In the BOM Whopper Part 1 we revealed that in the BOM’s latest round of unannounced adjustments there were big increases in the rate of Australian summer warming. It turns out a lot of the summer rise comes from changes to February. Mysteriously, there were large changes to the national average of the last three years. Let that sink in.

These changes were incomprehensible because while the averaged “whole nation” got warmer, there were no changes to the data in any of the 104 individual stations.

It’s all rather spooky… but what it isn’t, is scientific….

Ms Nova’s posts can be read in full here for Part One  and here for Part Two. As she observes, “The cheapest way to prevent man-made global warming is stop the BOM altering the data.”