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February 28th 2012 print

Guy Sorman

The New Rebellions

Across the globe, technology-empowered protesters seek to disrupt the political and economic order.


What Australia’s copy-cat protesters are copying.


The New Rebellions

Guy Sorman

Across the globe, technology-empowered protesters seek to disrupt the political and economic order.

The media have drawn conservative fire for lavishing so much attention on the motley crew of young dropouts, half-educated college students, and older hippies who make up the Occupy Wall Street movement (OWS). Yet the movement, though its numbers have been exaggerated, may deserve all the coverage as part of a much broader political shift.

Across the globe—from Chile to the Middle East to South Korea—young protesters similar to Zuccotti Park’s unwashed have, like their American counterparts, aggressively used social media to organize and take to the streets, seeking to disrupt what they perceive to be the corruption and unfairness of existing political and economic systems.

Rebellions, after all, can sometimes change the world—and not always for the better.

Read on at City Journal