QED

Big Nanny Will Tell You What to Think

Some years ago I took a friend to a country pub for lunch. I asked him what he wanted to drink and he said a glass of dry white wine. At the bar I ordered his wine and, for myself, a double gin and tonic. Did I get a blast from the hatchet-faced old trout behind the bar!

“I’ve done the Course in the Responsible Sale and Service of Alcohol and I am not permitted to serve you a double spirit,” she hissed. Very, very school-marmy stuff. Now I’m an adult and I don’t like being spoken to as if I am a naughty child. Or worse, some sort of moral leper or social degenerate. So I re-ordered the glass of wine, and a gin and tonic and a straight gin, no ice. When she plonked them on the counter I poured the straight gin into the gin and tonic. The old girl was well nigh apoplectic, as one expects from a bully defied.

Now the white wine was served in a glass with that little frosted line about a third of the way up. You have noticed those, I am sure. Someone in the Office of Let’s Interfere In People’s Lives And Control Them came up with this ‘policy initiative’ and the rest of us came to heel like well trained dogs and accepted it. After all, it’s not my responsibility whether I drink to excess. In this day and age, the State has decided to take up the task of protecting me from myself, us from ourselves. I am here simply to obey; as we do with most things our Elites tell us we must do today.

The Little Line On The Wine Glass is indicative of the world we live in and accept, mostly without question. It’s a world of constant interference in our lives by governments, self-appointed betters, victim groups against whom no adverse comment is permitted, teachers, university lecturers and those awful people on breakfast TV shows, videotic screechers who insist on telling us what can and cannot be put in a kid’s school lunch box. In short, we have allowed ourselves to become a society of infantilised, brow beaten , subservient wimps — ordered about and regulated at every turn, mostly by those on government payrolls. Fancy a little fresh air and exercise on your socially isolated bicycle? Better put that helmet on or you’ll pretty soon be in close proximity to the policeman writing you a ticket. Australians, unlike every other bike rider in the world, need to be told how to dress.

What’s the result of all this? Well, when we have to behave like mature adults, able to think and decide for ourselves, as in this present situation — how do so many of us react? Like the small children in adults’ bodies we’ve been forced for decades to become. decades.

As the restrictions imposed by the coronavirus begin to impact, some are not coping; some are behaving outrageously; some are in melt-down; some are panicking because many of us have long ago evaded the responsibility to think and act for ourselves. As such, we’ve forgotten how to be adults because we only know what it’s like to live in Big Nanny’s ever present shadow, expecting to have things done for us and to us. We gave the State that power by not standing up for ourselves  and telling its operatives to keep their faces and and interference out of our wine glasses and lives.

Now many of us feel powerless. Is it any wonder?

4 comments
  • Peter Smith

    Lovely stuff Phillip. Speak to people out and about, as I still do despite injunctions to keep my distance, and fortunately you still get two reactions to the governments’ current and ever-increasing restrictions. One is like mine; cynical that governments are getting it right or ever do. But the other, increasingly common I feel, is that, well, they must be doing it for our own good and we don’t want to be like Italy. Robotically obedient, like Stepford wives.

  • Biggles

    A report this morning was that the Victoria Police Association would seek authority for its Members to separate people on the street whom they consider are not complying with ‘social-distancing’ requirements. I imagine that Orwell would not have foreseen that either.

  • DG

    At some venues the wine glasses have a ‘big glass’ line somewhat above the standard drink line. Ordering the big glass is a little more costly than the little glass, but cheaper than two little glasses. It is also just the right quantity for a nice drink with a steak and chips.

  • Stephen Due

    Big Nanny also looks after your children for you. She tells you how to raise your children, and decides for you what they will be taught at school. She has taken steps to ensure they can have sex when it suits them – preferably sooner rather than later because it’s fun – and change sex when that suits them. Big Nanny thoughtfully provides a variety of parenting options for families, such as two fathers or two mothers, just for a change. As you can see, Big Nanny is big on diversity, big on tolerance. And Big Nanny is putting together a nice new rule book, to make everything better. Almost everything will be OK – except for a few teency weency little things that are not nice for Big Nanny. She wants you to know that as long as you are good, and obey her rules, you will not get hurt.

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