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April 11th 2017 print

Frank Pledge

My Agenda: Destroy Australia

As an Australian politician I know what is best for you little people, be it blackouts, green tape and red tape, or schools that teach what to think, not how to think. I've been working hard to make all that and worse the norm and now, sooner than I ever dared hope, victory is at hand

tongue out mockeryI am an Australian politician.  It does not matter to which party I belong because I am a ‘nowhere man’, like all the other members of my bipartisan swarm.  We do not need to communicate with each other because we know what needs to be done.  We are globalists, open-border internationalists, eager totalitarians, politically correct scolds and activists, propagandists posing as journalists and educators who pointedly do not educate.  We are those who believe in doing the right thing for the planet, rather than selfishly for Australia, and we do very niceely out of it, too, because a superior sort of person always deserves the reward of other people’s money in large amounts.

We instinctively know that destroying the old Australia is something we need to do as our contribution to saving the planet from the human vermin destroying it.  Fortunately, we also know there is no organised political front that can oppose us.  Collectivism always beats the individual, as we can spontaneously organise the gang numbers to crush individual dissent – and, of course, we have the support of the media, the ABC, the AHRC and thuggish trolls of all shades. Yes, we recognise Australians will suffer and that the nation will be impoverished, but we accept that as collateral damage. We know the survival of the planet is at stake.  Sacrificing you is necessary.

It has been a long battle, but we have almost won the war to de-industrialise, to undermine the society that built this country.  We have an agenda and we have taken it too far for anyone to stop it, so embrace the new nation we have re-shaped for you, whether you like it or not.  As a globalist ‘Australian’ I am proud of what we have done, so let me do a little boasting. Hear me out and you will understand not only the internationalist future we have planned but also that further resistance is futile.

In 1992, Maurice Strong openly announced our plans when he called for the destruction of capitalism and announced that it was our duty to bring about its collapse. We heard his call and set about assembling the means to achieve this aim.  We knew that it had to be done secretly, but in plain sight, so we infiltrated the UN, the universities, the NGOs, mainstream communications and the right-of-centre political parties.  The weapons we created were the demonization of energy (hydrocarbon fuels), nuclear power, hydro (by amusingly claiming they stopped the rivers from ‘running free’) and the promotion of alternative, expensive fake power sources in the form of some seriously outrageous ideas that we marketed as ‘clean energy’.

With overwhelming support from many sources we frightened governments into complying with our agenda. Those who didn’t, we targeted for marginalisation and destruction with our lies and distortions.  Even I am surprised how easy it was to convince people to part with their money to build unreliable wind farms, solar powered shadow grids (that are so useless their output is reduced by up to 80% by just a layer of dust – and we build them in dusty deserts!).

Of course, producing electricity was not their purpose — the ‘clean green’ palaver obscures the way we go about extracting subsidies, which is the main game.  To test the limits of insanity we suggest non-starters like ‘hot rocks’ and tidal energy as “renewable” sources of electricity.  We knew they would not work (any first year engineering student could have told you that), but these scams achieved their real aim of burning money and reducing the wealth available to provide roads, hospitals and schools, all the while making electricity expensive and unreliable. Manufacturing and smelting operations could not tolerate this situation so they began to close.  Our objective of de-industrialisation was now an inevitable, soon-to-be reality.

We falsely linked reliable energy to global cooling, then seamlessly changed our story to make it the weapon against global warming. When the global climate became neither much hotter nor much cooler, we adroitly switched the bogeyman’s label to ‘climate change’.  Our propaganda machine is now so polished and effective we could suggest that black is white and then, when everyone was in agreement, we could prove our point by changing white to black again.  That’s how confident we are. With the media, academics and my fellow politicians in fearful agreement, we cannot not lose. And if we encounter a serious opponent — a particularly witty cartoonist, say — we can use the courts or Australian Human Rights Commission to persecute any dissenters. And believe me, did we ever do that!

We squared the circle by ensuring energy rationing became a possibility, something that seemed an impossibility in the vibrant, realist ‘can do’ society Australia once was.  Why was rationing an objective, you ask?  Because when commodities are in short supply the people will appeal to us, the political elite, to save them.  All we need are one or two more turns of the screw to break the will of those who still believe in Australian sovereignty. And that day is close, believe me, very close indeed..

Despite a million gas-fracking drill holes in other parts of the world failing to have contaminated any known groundwater, state governments wouldn’t have a bar of the evidence. Exploratory gas drilling was outlawed in Victoria and the Northern Territory. In South Australia (the jewel in our crown), we crippled it with litigation. In Queensland we rounded up. and hyped-up, the usual gullible flock and had them ‘lock the gates’. You see, even when governments work against our objectives, we find ways to humble them. There’s nothing like a hippy in a koala costume to scare your more querulous politician into voting against the common good. Have you noticed how impotent governments are against our NGO agents, who have effortlessly tied up the Adani Carmichael Basin project for years in a Byzantine legal maze?  Is there any doubt that we will soon see Adani leave Australia altogether for Indonesia or the Philippines.

Last month’s closure of the Hazelwood power station in Victoria makes me particularly proud.  What a win we had over reality and truth! Here I would be remiss not to thank our schools and educators, who have done so much to make sure children know what to to think, not how to think. Have you seen the way our kids keep dropping down the international rankings for educational achievement, even as we make sure we spend more of other people’s money than ever before on schools and teacher salaries. Well done, chalkies!

A few months ago a talking head on the radio was interviewing an excited Victorian Minister for Energy, Lily D’Ambrosio, who was on her way to announce to loyal Hazelwood CFMEU members and the breathless press that Hazelwood would be closing.  She explained that the station was more than 50 years old, expensive to operate and the ‘dirtiest’ — we get to define the word — coal-fired power station in Australia.  Even for a Labor minister three errors in three ‘factual’ statements is right up there with the best we could hope for. Oh, and by the way, have you seen Ms D’Ambrosio with her advisers (below). Fresh-faced, eager and usefully ardent, their lack of acumen and experience is more than compensated by a self-righteous zealotry. Once again, well done, chalkies!

lilys kiddie club

Dismissing the collateral damage beyond the loss of a reliable and what should be a cheap source of electricity, Ms D’Ambrosio shrugged off the lost jobs of the skilled people who worked at Hazelwood, nor did she spare more than a bland word or two for the economic devastation of local towns dependent on those fired workers’ spending. Instead she  assured all and sundry that green jobs would make up the shortfall and, in the meantime, there would be subsidies and counselling and lots of public servants and NGO contractors with clipboards and kind words for the hungry and unemployed. The LaTrobe Valley from now will have a social-worker led economy!

If you have ever visited a ghost town like Burra Burra, Coolgardie or Cossack, you’ll know the romantic appeal of down-at-heel decay cannot be denied.  Adding Morwell, Yallourn and Traralgon to the list will produce the same sort of tourist attractions in Gippsland. Ms D’Ambrosio did very well parroting all those empty green nostrums while keeping a straight face, but she did slip a bit in not noting the tourist potential of towns where residents will have fled as their property values sank to zero.

Mind you, there could have been trouble if any reporter had pointed out that neither wind farms nor solar plants in Queensland produced a jot of electricity for days after Cyclone Debbie swept through. Fortunately, as noted above, your typical environmental reporter is none to bright, so we dodged that bullet. Well done, journalism school professors!

 

JUST a couple of decades ago I would have thought that our other goal of food-rationing was an impossibility.  Australia was a massive exporter of primary produce.  Today my dream of permanent shortages is approaching reality.  Thanks to the almost comical alarms and emotional scares we broadcast, we now have so many marine parks we must import 80% of our seafood.  Ours is an island continent surrounded by water, yet we must now import fish. If anyone wonders why that should be the case, one of our tame, grant-lavished academics starts yelling that the Great Barrier Reef is almost dead. This helps kill the overseas tourist trade as well.

Using the recent 11-year drought as our foundation we built the myth that ‘the new norm is a thousand year drought’.  This should have been an easily exposed fiction in Dorothea MacKellar’s ‘land of droughts and flooding rains’, but the fiction that the dams would never fill again served our purpose well. State governments squandered billions of dollars on useless, unnecessary and now-mothballed desalination plants. Our union mates loved that one. Well done, bruvvers, for all that feather-bedding and all those eight-figure cost-overruns.

Our dream of impoverishing Australia was already working well enough when, in a stroke of genius, we took it up a notch by  stopping farmers from farming, producing food, even clearing their own land.  We depleted the Treasury by buying back ‘water rights’ so irrigation became impossible, making farms uneconomic and destroying the rural economy.  To hasten the process we had our agents at the ABC whip up a shock! horror! expose and suspended live cattle exports the very next morning. Indonesia now imports cattle from as far away as Argentina. This was a market Australia once had pretty much all to itself, so we ruined it.  We order the planting of noxious native weeds near farms and along road verges, all the better for promoting bushfires.  We allow feral animals to infest our National Parks, banned hunters from killing them and told graziers who complain about ravaging wild dogs that those same parks, with all their foxes, rabbits, deer, pigs and goats were actually untouched “wilderness”. How dare you complain about a few hundred dead sheep, we sneered, when all you want to do is make money and ours is the protection of Gaia.

Naturally, we banned high-yield, genetically modified crops, such as ‘Golden Rice’, and painted it as ‘frankenfood’.  As a bonus, the lack of the vitamins that are genetically spliced into genetically modified crops kills around 50,000 children a year, removing more human parasites from the planet. I could go on, but you get the point.  Australia can now barely feed and sustain itself thanks to our efforts. Where does your breakfast orange juice come thse days? Brazil or California, most likely.

The aim of my swarm has always been to break the back of Australia by simultaneously using multiple strategies to attack the basis of culture, national pride and unity.  These strategies are well advanced.  I would love to show you how clever we elites are compared to you, but I won’t give away too many secrets.

Know, however, that we set out to erode and overwhelm the relaxed Australian culture of old — we see it as a lack of lack of culture — by bringing in legions of people who will never assimilate. More than that, we made sure they did not assimilate by stressing the importance of group identity and dividing the country into multicultural tribes. Parliament must now misdirect more billions of dollars to security services in the name of keeping us safe.  Yet we are no longer safe and can never be again, no matter how many times elderly ladies’ handbags are searched at the Sydney and Melbourne cricket grounds. On cue, one of our favoured mouthpieces pooh-hooed terrorism as nothing more than an inconvenience, a mere minor “irritation”. Dare to disagree and, well, our media auxiliary will denounce you as a bigot and a racist.

Education is a gem that took us decades to achieve, but we are now there.  Schools teach blather and tosh to children who can neither read nor write effectively, yet they know with absolute certainty that humans are destroying the planet, and that we “stole” Australia from the Aborigines, who presided over what they confidently believe to have been a Stone Age paradise. We’ve also made sure our Anzacs were re-cast not as heroes but as racist, raping war criminals, and it has all come together better than we might ever have hoped. A national self-loathing was our ultimate aim and that goal is at hand.  My grandson can repeat a faux-Aboriginal ‘welcome to country’ mantra, having heard it scores of times, but not the National Anthem or the Lord’s Prayer. I am proud that my swarm has won again.

I loathe Australia, always have, and can hardly wait for the reward of a superbly paid position at the United Nations in New York. So don’t forget to vote for me, though it matters little if you do not.

We are so close to winning it’s all over bar the tears. We took Australia away from you and you didn’t even notice.

How smart are we! How complacent are you!

Comments [31]

  1. Anthony Cox says:

    Horrendous and true; alarmism has killed Australia. Islam will pick over the bones. The same creatures who have facilitated alarmism have also facilitated Islam. It is no consolation that Islam will do to them what they have done to Australia.

  2. Salome says:

    Very nice but the cheap shot at teachers (I am not one myself) was not exactly fair. It’s not the teachers, but the system, that has them tying themselves in compliance knots and having to give every child a “C” and not being able to be frank in their reports. It’s not the personnel, but the policies. Oh, and the parents, who refuse to believe that their little darling could possibly have done anything wrong, or not done any necessary work.

    • Anthony Cox says:

      That’s true to a certain extent; but compliance with alarmist syllabus is a bit like the Nuremberg Defence. Decent teachers have to speak up about not just alarmism but all sorts of activism being foisted on children.

      • Jody says:

        More correctly it’s the teaching unions who are destroying the state system. A lot of hard-working and dedicated teachers – very good people – are being force-fed propaganda to teach their students. They’ve gone from school to university and back to school and, from my experience of the profession, they are not ‘worldly’ people. Ergo, very susceptible to the latest fads – especially when they spend their working lives with more children than adults. I got out of the profession because I was tired of being victim to the incessant bugs which made me ill and the propaganda which passed for a curriculum. I felt it was anti-intellectual.

    • ianl says:

      Not in the STEM area. Any high school science teacher who actually knows what they are talking about – like the complete scientific method – is transferred out on the insistence of the rest of the science staff, who find it quite embarrassing that the students can see how little actual science they know simply by comparing them with the real one.

      Yes, this *does* happen, constantly. My own children have experienced it. The best actual science teacher, the one they learnt from and respected, was abruptly transferred out. I wrote to the then District Inspector asking for the reason for this disruption. The unashamed written reply said that the transfer was at the request of other staff who resented the detailed knowledge the offending teacher had.

      We are importing engineers to design, maintain and repair our sewage systems. We now cannot even keep our own cities sanitary and free of medieval type diseases without buying in outside expertise.

      This article is genuinely good, biting satire. I am disseminating it as widely as I can. It’s just a pity we can’t actually deposit it forcefully in the ABC’s fundamental.

  3. Keith Kennelly says:

    Here’s a radical idea.

    Reduce the pay and conditions of all public servants.

    Make public Service about public service and not about money.

  4. Rob Brighton says:

    As accurate as it is sad.

  5. Jody says:

    And also don’t forget that the modern education system is all about making sure that (as the “Readers’ Digest” most surely promised) every child wins a prize. In order for that to occur there has to be dumbing down; in short, it’s based on an ideology of ‘equality’. Outcomes, opportunity and results. Lesson 1: start the kids at age 5; put them all into the same class and move them en mass, year by year, until they “attain” the HSC. Might as well grade them by shoe size, as one of my colleagues once quipped.

  6. en passant says:

    If I insult a woman in a burqua (at least I assume it is a woman in a tent), or tug at a hijab that is a punishable hate crime and islamophobia.

    But the attack on a couple wearing crosses is a justifiable action as they provoked the peaceful religion by openly wearing religious crosses around their necks.
    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/04/10/australian-beaten-cross-beaten-muslim-gang-shouting/

    I always find it warms my heart when an enabler of our destruction becomes collateral damage as reported in the latest ‘missionary truck conversion event’ in Sweden. The first person killed was reported as:
    “Maïlys Dereymaeker, 31, was hit by the vehicle and died instantly at the scene when failed asylum seeker Rakhmat Akhmat Akilov ploughed a truck into crowds in an Islamic State-inspired terrorist attack.
    The mother-of-one was “very committed to helping asylum seekers” in detention centres for Belgium’s Immigration Office. Dereymaeker often helped illegal immigrants like her alleged killer whose asylum claim was rejected in Sweden last year.
    Belgium’s Het Nieuwsblad reports that she was “always seeking meetings” with illegal migrants in detention, stating a desire to understand them better and to “build bridges”.”

    I I am supposed to, but I cannot even pity her 18-month old son for his loss.

    Will this wake anyone up or change their minds? I doubt it as the article shows, there is another sinister agenda here.

    • ianl says:

      From the essay:

      > “It does not matter to which party I belong because I am a ‘nowhere man’, like all the other members of my bipartisan swarm …”

      and:

      > “Collectivism always beats the individual, as we can spontaneously organise the gang numbers to crush individual dissent …”

      This works especially well when the incumbents can vote themselves their own emoluments and later-day pensions and then hide this blatant self-interest behind an “independent arbiter” whom they appoint and dismiss at whim and will. One-world collectivist government as espoused by various UN and green NGO idealogues is actually a real aspiration with these people; as the essay says: “… a superior sort of person always deserves the reward of other people’s money in large amounts …” so voting themselves lifelong sinecures makes a lot of sense as all that is required of them is to help the collective along.

      What can change this now with any hope of relatively peaceful means ? I was of the view up to my mid-50′s that rational frameworks and decisions were prevailing. I recognise now that was a deluded Pollyanna gullible.

  7. Jody says:

    Now, here’s something REALLY FUNNY to tickle your fancy. Pauline Hanson and ON has been the target of a “Four Corners” (does that mean it’s for squares?) program and now Hanson has said she won’t pass the budget unless there are “significant cuts to the ABC”. In our household there’s much hilarity. Tells you a lot about the smarts of the ABC that it goes after the one person who can cut them off and turn them into stumps!! LOL

    • ianl says:

      I hope she and Robertson define “significant” as >80% and then stick to their guns :)

      • Jody says:

        I thought there was more than 2 ON Senators? Anyway, it’s absolutely delicious that all this is unfolding. Now, to get Talkbull to stop embarrassing us all taking selfies with world leaders!!! He’s Kevin Rudd all over again.

  8. Having followed Pledge’s career, from remote prospector studying and writing his incisive essays long-hand by kerosene lamp, I’m thrilled that he has made it to Parliament. I hope that he opposes every efforts by Gramscians, Left and Right, to tear down our institutions and denigrate our hard-fought systems of values, imperfect – but improvable – as they may be. Here he nails the Greens’ drive to shut down production of all sorts, mineral and agricultural in particular: that has been alarming me for some time.

    I’m also concerned, as he is, about the segregationist push in Indigenous policy towards a separate State, even a separate country, and the denigration of any move towards integration and inclusiveness, signified by the preference for ‘recognition’ rather than eventual ‘reconciliation’. That ideology has done terrible damage to the aspirations and careers of many Indigenous university students, who preferred mainstream to Indigenous-confined study, who were mostly urban, just like the majority of Indigenous people, by initiating and perpetuating myths about Indigenous culture and history. Crooks et al.’s “Voices From The Past” is a refreshing antidote to that insidious trend.

    I look forward to many more of Pledge’s valuable insights.

  9. bullockornis says:

    Excellent. Would that our politicians were so honest.

    But it tends to lean towards blame. Blaming these people who’ve done all that and are doing it. Mock them, deride them, hate them…

    It’s the beginning of a conspiracy theory isn’t it? They’re all conspiring to do all this.

    But they’re not. They work together, sure, they pat each other on the back, the speak the same language – it is that kind of a conspiracy but not more. Not a devilish pact.

    What’s happened is the world has grown too complicated on the one hand and too connected on the other.

    So that the complications get to be too much for the average citizen, politician, journalist… etc. They just can’t think things through. They don’t have the wit to do it nor the knowledge nor the natural desire… all of that is above their pay grade, human beings are naturally somewhere down on the lower levels of performance and aspiration.

    And the connectedness puts the lowest of the low on an equal footing with anyone/everyone else. Like me here now.

    If the majority are naturally a bit dull, disinterested, unmotivated, uneducated, uninspired and selfish then in the times of great connectedness with equal weight to all – thats the kind of collective voice that will predominate and influence everything to that way of thinking/doing.

    It’s like we’ve let the mob into the control room, the bridge of the ship, and the ship is far more complicated, moves faster in more dangerous waters than ever before and needs more careful control…

    • ianl says:

      Way too saccharine …

      True, the “mob” are not much interested in these things and as a result are gullible.

      But:

      > ” … voting themselves lifelong sinecures makes a lot of sense as all that is required of them is to help the collective along”

      Aus elections have long become just squabbles over whose turn it is next.

  10. pabloAU says:

    “Why was rationing an objective, you ask? Because when commodities are in short supply the people will appeal to us, the political elite, to save them”

    “…the lack of the vitamins (…) kills around 50,000 children a year, removing more human parasites from the planet”

    Actually rationing of electricity would be rather counter-productive demographically-wise from their (green) point of view, if history makes sense.
    In some Central-European country in 70s the intermittent electricity supplies correlated with a surge in the number of babies born. As it was spelled out years later by some American man after Katrina (2005? I think): no electricity, no TV, cold, … one thing led to another- then boom! – that is a demographic one.

    At the time the jokes about “level of(electricity) supplies” announced daily on the radio
    - the higher the lesser supply – level 17: people burn wood in their flats for heating , while the last let’s say level 24: people burn down communist party headquarters

  11. Ian MacDougall says:

    Despite a million gas-fracking drill holes in other parts of the world failing to have contaminated any known groundwater, state governments wouldn’t have a bar of the evidence. Exploratory gas drilling was outlawed in Victoria and the Northern Territory. In South Australia (the jewel in our crown), we crippled it with litigation. In Queensland we rounded up. and hyped-up, the usual gullible flock and had them ‘lock the gates’. You see, even when governments work against our objectives, we find ways to humble them.

    Overall, quite a rant here from Frank Pledge. And I actually agree with one or two bits of it.
    Frank stands for everything that is proper, right and reasonable: any fool can see that. It follows that any opposition to this litany is inherently unreasonable; like for example, Lock the Gate.
    Well, my wife and I live in NW NSW and happen to be supporters of Lock the Gate, as is our local council, and a multitude of our neighbours near and far. There are signs up to that effect all over the countryside; nem con. And the reason is simple. The sub-artesian aquifer from which we draw our stock and domestic water lies above the coal seam beds from which the interested parties want to extract a very profitable quantity of gas, (and of course, trouser the money.)
    We are assured that the aquifer can have a borehole drilled right through it without the gas and fracking chemicals contaminating the underlying water, and when the gas well is exhausted, it will not just be abandoned. It will be back-filled with reinforced concrete and thus sealed; forever. Because for as long as there are people and animals living on the plains above it, that aquifer will be their only reliable source of water.
    Portland cement was invented in 1820. No concrete fixtures can be older than that. (The ancients used lime mortar in the joints of their buildings.) But the reo bars in reinforced concrete rust from contact with groundwater, and ‘concrete cancer’ results, with crumbling and splitting concrete. By the time that disaster strikes, the frackers will be long gone and well and truly out of reach; of the government, law, or us cockies and descendants.
    So locking them out now is eminently fair and reasonable. The coal and gas will still be there.
    I dare say the rest of Frank’s rant could be gone through and similar points made to puncture its veneer of rationality.
    But as I said, not all of it.

    • ianl says:

      > “But the reo bars in reinforced concrete rust from contact with groundwater …”

      Yet another of your straw men, trollster.

      Steel bars are not used in back-filling drill holes. Research accurately what *is* used before opining. Fat chance of that.

      Frank Pledge is correct – hundreds of thousands of fracked gas wells have been drilled in many US basins. A hard survey of these by the USG/Duke University found leaks had occurred in less than 1% of the holes and these leaks were caused by careless outer sealing of the piping inserted into the holes (thoroughly controllable with targeted, precise regulation).

      Oh, and faulting/jointing in the overlying Mesozoic (the age of the GAB sandstone aquifers) is well mapped for centuries now so pretending these strata are unblemished except by debil-debil miners is plain stupid. How many bore-water holes have been drilled into the GAB aquifers … those that have been abandoned are not even back-filled, are they, trollster ?

      > ” … trouser the money”

      Another of your constant, whiney straw men. If you don’t want people who risk upfront capital to stand a chance of profit, then mine it yourself; you state quite circuitously that the gas and coal will remain. But you’d rather just whinge away, trollster. Remember that the State Govt charges royalties and in the case of NSW also large upfront sale capital before a single ml of gas or water can flow (because the State owns the minerals, not the surface owner)- but the water bores are not subject to those upfront payments and in fact (as I know from long, hard experience) water bores do require a (minimum cost) licence and lodgement of the completed drill log with the relevant State authority but this is not necessarily complied with. The GAB is riddled with these. I have searched the database many times for non-existent drillhole logs for very real water-bores; the reason these are not recorded is obvious.

      Rant at the top of your voice now as you wish – but tell someone who cares.

      • Ian MacDougall says:

        Rant at the top of your voice now as you wish – but tell someone who cares.

        Well, you obviously don’t.
        If your focus is on the cash return (and arguably in your case, it is) then you won’t give a damn over any threat posed to anyone else’s water supply: now or at any time in the future. Just as in the case of CO2 and global warming.
        Have a google of ‘gas fracking, contamination of aquifers’. See what you come up with.
        You don’t have to be Einstein to realise that drilling through a groundwater aquifer to reach hydrocarbon gas trapped in beds underneath carries risks: acceptable or otherwise depending on where you stand in relation to the use of the water vis a vis access to the gas.

        https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fracking-can-contaminate-drinking-water/

        https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fracking-can-contaminate-drinking-water/

          • en passant says:

            Ian MacBot,
            I fervently hope that you put your money where your mouth is and do not make any profits. That would be the right thing to do

          • Ian MacDougall says:

            Ian MacDougall
            Your comment is awaiting moderation.
            April 15, 2017 at 5:32 pm

            Rant at the top of your voice now as you wish – but tell someone who cares.

            Well, you obviously don’t.
            If your focus is on the cash return (and arguably in your case, it is) then you won’t give a damn over any threat posed to anyone else’s water supply: now or at any time in the future. Just as in the case of CO2 and global warming.
            Have a google of ‘gas fracking, contamination of aquifers’. See what you come up with.
            You don’t have to be Einstein to realise that drilling through a groundwater aquifer to reach hydrocarbon gas trapped in beds underneath carries risks: acceptable or otherwise depending on where you stand in relation to the use of the water vis a vis access to the gas.

            https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fracking-can-contaminate-drinking-water/

          • en passant says:

            The rising seas will be washing across your doorstep in no time at all, so it is a moot point.
            I read the article you refer to (I bet you hate it when people do that). Let me quote:
            “One such chemical was methanol. The simplest alcohol, it can trigger permanent nerve damage and blindness in humans when consumed in sufficient quantities. But methanol degrades rapidly and is reduced within days to trace amounts.” Nothing to see here.

            I have drunk the water from the Great Artesian Basin and it is not ever going to be bottled for sale to the inner city latte set.

            The risks are minimal and the benefits great, including for you as you can be paid for giving up a Tennis Court piece of land on you vast property (before the sea washes it away).

  12. Susan says:

    Good to keep politicians in check, but I’m not entirely sure we can blame them for the degenerative ills afflicting western democracy. Lots of people voted for them.

    With all its shortcomings, Westminster democracy has one great advantage. I don’t need to blast my fellow citizen for holding views which are opposite to my ones. We can both blame the politicians we voted for. But this fools no one. Greenies and lefties are walking among us.

    Andrew (Susan’s husband)

    • Ian MacDougall says:

      Good to see that Susan is properly spoken for. ;-)
      But that greenies and lefties could be walking among us, without proper identification and even as we blog, is grounds for concern.

  13. Jody says:

    Please watch this excellent and ACCURATE spoof of Bill Shorten and Labor:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YN0SMFCE0Jw

  14. gardner.peter.d says:

    Brilliant, Frank Pledge! At least from Australia your path is direct to the United Nations. Europeans find the EU gets in the way. Mind you, the EU has executive power not possessed by the UN, I reckon its even chances as to which ultimately wins. he problem, as always, is who will be the top dog among many and diverse contenders. Usually such conflicts end with mutually destructive fighting, but at that unprecedented level of world domination, who would stop them?

    The question of Aborigines is interesting and not peculiar to Australia. Listening to all the mantras of acknowledging, respecting etc the original inhabitants of the land, the adulation of Aboriginal art, dream times, music, culture in general I find myself wondering how long it will before traditional Aboriginal beliefs and mores are given equivalence to Christian beliefs or to Western philosophies? Will Aborophobia become the twin sister of Islamophobia? I don’t think we should even settle for faux-respect. Why go through the pretence? Sure the Aborigines are in general less well off, less well educated, and less healthy and more criminally inclined than White Australians. Even if it is the case that there is discrimination against Aborigines how can the overall backward nature of Aboriginal culture – or Islamic, for that matter – either be blamed on Western white races or even held to be the equal of white Western cultures?

  15. Ian MacDougall says:

    Ianl (or whatever your real name is): I take it that your definition of a ‘troll’ is someone who does not agree with me 100% all the time.